Here’s How to Make a Budget For a Video Game

Thimbleweed Park
Image source: www.greenlightgames.co.uk

If you’re anything like me, you have a voracious appetite to learn everything there is to know about producing video games in the modern industry. Although I have no misguided beliefs that I would ever be able to code and design one, the process is still quite fascinating, much like it is with a film or piece of music.

In an age where every AAA developer is keen on spending the big bucks for bigger explosions, it’s more interesting to how to produce a game on a much smaller budget. In a post on his blog, Ron Gilbert of upcoming point-n-click adventurer Thimbleweed Park posted in detail about what exactly his Kickstarter backers are spending money on in an admirable feat of transparency.

Click the image below to see it all biggerer.

video game budget

We are planning on some new stretch goals in the next few months, and those are also not in the budget because if we don’t make the goals, they won’t become expenses. If we do, then all the numbers will be adjusted to account for the new work.

It’s also possible that we’ll move resources around, spend less on an artist and add a programmer. Budgets are living documents.

One thing to note, and I’m sure it will raise some eyebrows, is the monthly burn rate. That’s a lot of money to spend each month. No one line item is very large, but they add up and can catch you by surprise. This is a pretty barebones project (but not scrappy) and it still costs $20K-$30K a month. It why when I look at other Kickstarters asking for very little money and they have a three page long team list, I get skeptical.

Even though it’s quite vague at points (“misc stuff” will not fill investors with confidence), it’s still an insight that many of us don’t get when it comes to gaming. If anyone has a spare $100,000, let us know and we will get to work on a Cultured Vultures RPG ASAP.